What’s New in the Garden!

By Gazal Hamayouni and Corinna Roberts


If there's one thing true about the garden, it's that the weeding never ends. After planting new vegetables from seed, the fight begins to keep weeds from crowding out the seedlings. Photo by Mike Imwalle.


We have been working with the Santa Barbara Trust for Historic Preservation for three months now, and we have made a lot of progress in both the Presidio Northeast corner gardens as well as at El Cuartel. At the end of September, we began our internship by threshing White Sonora Wheat that had been grown this summer. By the beginning of October, we were able to plant a new crop of wheat, and started planting beans at El Cuartel.


The first radish of the fall crop! Photo by Mike Imwalle.


Behind the cocina on the Northeast corner of the Presidio we planted vegetables such as beets, carrots, radishes, celery, arugula, spinach, beans, and various types of lettuce. Once we planted the garden, we stepped back and focused our time on the grapes, which were at the end of their season. We trimmed up the vines so that visitors could get a better view of the other garden plants.


Working on "What's Blooming" with Anne Petersen at the Presidio Research Center. Photo by Mike Imwalle.


Most recently we published a fall version of “What’s Blooming,” an illustrated guide about the gardens that is distributed to Presidio visitors. Almost every day we go to water what we have planted so far, and we enjoy seeing the crops progress every week!

We hope you can come and check out all our hard work! Peace and vegetables!


A beautiful young red cabbage growing at the Presidio Northeast corner. Cabbages are a hardy cold-weather crop. Photo by Mike Imwalle.


Corrina and Gazal are seniors at The Anacapa School. They are about half-way through their fall semester garden internship at the Santa Barbara Trust for Historic Preservation.

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